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Microdermabrasion

This is also a very minimally invasive procedure that can be done on a regular and repetitive basis to remove the most superficial layers of dead skin cells in order to produce a rejuvenated skin appearance. Microdermabrasion can also be helpful in removing blackheads and whiteheads of comedonal acne. It can clean your pores and hinder any future breaks outs if used on a regular basis. Microdermabrasion also stimulates collagen networking to further even out skin texture and appearance.

Who is a are good candidate for microdermabrasion?

A good candidate for microdermabrasion is a physically healthy man or woman who is looking to minimize the appearance of acne prone or blotchy skin, fine lines and surface wrinkles, sun-damaged or uneven skin, keratoses, large pores, milia, rhytides, sebaceous hyperplasia or small scars.

Does microdermabrasion require anesthesia?

Anesthesia is typically not used during the microdermabrasion procedure. It is so relaxing that many people fall asleep during the procedure.

How long does the microdermabrasion procedure last?

Though multiple sessions are usually required, a single microdermabrasion procedure takes about thirty minutes to one hour to complete.

Is there much pain with the microdermabrasion procedure?

There is generally little or no pain. At the most, patients may experience a feeling similar to slight windburn or some minimal stinging around the eyes.

What about recovery after microdermabrasion?

Microdermabrasion involves virtually no downtime and normal activities can usually be resumed right away. The skin may feel a bit hot or flushed for the first day after the procedure. It is important, however, that patients avoid sun exposure for about a week.

Is it necessary to take time off from work after the microdermabrasion procedure?

Patients can typically resume their normal activities right away.

What are the risks associated with microdermabrasion?

Risks or complications associated with microdermabrasion are typically rare. Nevertheless, bleeding, infection, hyperpigmentation and perforation can occur.

Is microdermabrasion ever covered by insurance?

Insurance coverage is typically not available for microdermabrasion procedures performed solely for cosmetic purposes.

BOTOX®

Is Botox for me?

If you desire a slight improvement in your look or a “cleaning up” of age-related wrinkles, Botox Cosmetic may be for you. It is an effective and proven option for the patient who is hesitant to undergo surgery, yet wants to erase the deep creases and furrows of the face. Its safety is well established, as it has been used therapeutically for over 20 years.
Following treatment with Botox Cosmetic, you can expect to appear more relaxed and rested. Botox Cosmetic is also commonly used to reduce the heavy vertical creases between the eyebrows, flatten deep forehead wrinkles, and smooth out the crow’s feet area of the eyes.

When will I see the results and how long will it last?

You can generally expect to see results in three to five days, although it may take as long as two weeks. Most people can expect to enjoy the benefits for three to four months, and some people will see results lasting up to six months.

Juvéderm Perlane and Restylane®

What is the difference between Juvederm and Restylane?

Juvederm is a non-animal based injectable filler made in the laboratory. It is made of hyaluronic acid a material that is in the joints and bodies of all living things. It is a complex sugar that maintains its three dimensional shape in the body by attracting and holding large numbers of water molecules. Among its many natural functions, hyaluronic acid maintains the volume of the skin, keeps skin hydrated and maintains the shape of the eye. As we age, we lose hyaluronic acid from the skin and it loses its volume and structure. Injecting Juvederm into skin folds and wrinkles replaces that structure and volume. Juvederm contains a higher concentration of cross-linked hyaluronic acid and is more concentrated than Restylane. Juvederm is also supposed to last around eight months. What is Juvederm used for?

Juvederm is used for:

  • filling in nasolabial folds or “smile lines”
  • filling in glabellar lines (“frown lines” or “11 lines”) between the eyebrows
  • filling in “marionette” lines at the corners of the mouth
  • eliminating under eye dark circles by filling in the groove underneath the lower eyelid (“Non-Surgical Eye Lift”)
  • enhancing the lips

Laser Hair Removal

Can the laser remove hair permanently?

Many laser systems are currently available to remove unwanted hair. Although it is not possible to remove every hair with the laser, those hairs that are treated generally are permanently removed or reduced in number. Permanent reduction of hair is available today for most skin types to reverse the excessive growth of hair on the face, back, legs and bikini areas.

Does the laser work on all skin colors?

Light skin makes laser hair removal easier to perform. Fewer treatments are required, and better, faster results are obtained. People with darker skin can be treated, but results are slower, more sessions are required, and greater expertise is required on the part of the laser center. Laser hair removal must be individualized for each patient.

Does the laser work on all hair colors?

Dark hair absorbs more laser energy and is easier to treat. Coarse dark hair responds the best to laser treatment. Light hair is more difficult to treat. Blonde or red hair is very difficult to treat. Multiple treatment sessions are required, and results are variable.

Does laser hair removal require multiple treatments?

Although one laser session can produce long-term hair removal, as a rule multiple treatment sessions are necessary to obtain optimal results. In large part, this is due to the fact that laser hair removal is most effective for hair which is in the anagen phase. Anagen is the growth phase of hair. Since hair grows in cycles, not all of the hairs are in anagen at any given time. Additional sessions are necessary to catch all of the hairs when they are in anagen.

What areas can be treated

Any area, except adjacent to the eye, where there is excess hair. The most common areas treated are the face, upper lip, neck, chest, underarms, back, abdomen, bikini line, and legs.

Any area, except adjacent to the eye, where there is excess hair. The most common areas treated are the face, upper lip, neck, chest, underarms, back, abdomen, bikini line, and legs.

Non-Surgical Facelift

How is a non-surgical facelift different from a traditional facelift surgery?

Non-surgical facelift is a safe, non-invasive alternative to traditional facelift surgery which avoids the risks of surgery and does not leave scars. Recovery from a traditional facelift can involve weeks or months of intense pain, swelling and bruising, with normal recovery taking one to two months. Most patients who experience the non-surgical facelift return to work in one to three days after treatment. There may be some minor bruising, however there is no significant swelling or pain.
The cosmetic results of a traditional facelift last seven to ten years. While the anti-aging effects are temporary, a traditional facelift can permanently change the basic look of your face. The results of a non-surgical facelift are subtle, but very effective. It does not alter your basic look, but rather helps to restore your youthful appearance.

Betalift®

Who are candidates for chemical peels?

Women and men whose skin looks dull and has a “weathered” look; people with a blotchy complexion, fine lines and wrinkles, dry or flaky skin; people who have acne, acne scars or oily skin; or a variety of other conditions.

How do I take care of my skin afterwards?

We’ll teach you how to care for your rejuvenated skin, and we’ll help you establish a skin care regimen to maintain your new glow.

Glycolic 70% Acid Peel Treatment

What are chemical peels?

Chemical peels produce controlled injury to the skin which promotes growth of new skin with improved appearance. Many different chemicals are used for chemical peels and include glycolic acid, trichloroacetic acid (TCA), salicylic acid and phenol. The different chemical solutions produce different degrees of injury of the skin. There are two layers of the skin; the outer layer is called the epidermis and the inner layer, the dermis. Superficial peels (such as glycolic acid peels) produce very superficial injury, confined to the epidermis and can help improve conditions such as acne and discoloration. Deeper peels produce injury within the dermis and can reverse moderate-to-severe photoaging and wrinkles. In general, the deeper peels offer the most dramatic results but require longer recovery and carry a higher risk of complications.

Why are chemical peels used?

Chemical peels are used for the treatment of photoaging (from sun damage), wrinkles, scarring, acne, precancerous lesions, and discoloration (including melasma, freckles, and age spots).

How are chemical peels performed?

There are many different kinds of peels and each one is performed differently. In general, chemical peels usually begin with vigorous cleansing of the skin. Very light peels (e.g. low potency glycolic acid, 10-20% TCA) only penetrate the dead skin cells that sit atop the epidermis and produce almost no injury. Sometimes, this level of peel is called “exfoliation”. Light peels (70% glycolic acid, 25-35% TCA) injure the entire epidermis and stimulate the regeneration of a new epidermis. This level of chemical peel may produce a burning sensation during the procedure. Medium depth peels involve injury to the upper level of the dermis. Injury to the dermis stimulates the formation of collagen and “plumps” up the skin. 35% TCA, in combination with another chemical such as glycolic acid, is used safely with minimal discomfort. Burning is the most common complaint during the procedure and this is usually well controlled with cool compresses, and sometimes topical anesthetic. Deep peels involve injury to the mid dermis and are usually performed using a phenol solution and anesthesia.

How long do chemical peels take?

Most peels are performed in less than one hour, depending on size of the area being treated.

How many peels will I need?

The superficial peels are usually done several times over the course of several months. The deeper peels usually only need to be performed once to achieve the desired effect. Regardless of the technique, you will likely need repeat treatments in the future.

How long do the results last?

With good sun protection, results can last months to years, depending on the depth of the peel. Generally, the deeper peels have a more long lasting effect.

What are the risks of chemical peels?

Superficial peels are quite safe although rarely minor irritation of the skin can occur. The risks of deeper peels include infection, scarring, redness, and discoloration. Furthermore, during a deep peel, anesthesia must be used and vital signs must be monitored throughout the procedure.

How long after a chemical peel before I can return to normal activities?

Superficial peels require no recovery time (hence the name “lunchtime peel”). Recovery from a deep peel requires occlusive bandages and can take weeks to months under normal circumstances.

TCA Peel

What are chemical peels?

Chemical peels produce controlled injury to the skin which promotes growth of new skin with improved appearance. Many different chemicals are used for chemical peels and include glycolic acid, trichloroacetic acid (TCA), salicylic acid and phenol. The different chemical solutions produce different degrees of injury of the skin. There are two layers of the skin; the outer layer is called the epidermis and the inner layer, the dermis. Superficial peels (such as glycolic acid peels) produce very superficial injury, confined to the epidermis and can help improve conditions such as acne and discoloration. Deeper peels produce injury within the dermis and can reverse moderate-to-severe photoaging and wrinkles. In general, the deeper peels offer the most dramatic results but require longer recovery and carry a higher risk of complications.

Why are chemical peels used?

Chemical peels are used for the treatment of photoaging (from sun damage), wrinkles, scarring, acne, precancerous lesions, and discoloration (including melasma, freckles, and age spots).

How are chemical peels performed?

There are many different kinds of peels and each one is performed differently. In general, chemical peels usually begin with vigorous cleansing of the skin. Very light peels (e.g. low potency glycolic acid, 10-20% TCA) only penetrate the dead skin cells that sit atop the epidermis and produce almost no injury. Sometimes, this level of peel is called “exfoliation”. Light peels (70% glycolic acid, 25-35% TCA) injure the entire epidermis and stimulate the regeneration of a new epidermis. This level of chemical peel may produce a burning sensation during the procedure. Medium depth peels involve injury to the upper level of the dermis. Injury to the dermis stimulates the formation of collagen and “plumps” up the skin. 35% TCA, in combination with another chemical such as glycolic acid, is used safely with minimal discomfort. Burning is the most common complaint during the procedure and this is usually well controlled with cool compresses, and sometimes topical anesthetic. Deep peels involve injury to the mid dermis and are usually performed using a phenol solution and anesthesia.

How long do chemical peels take?

Most peels are performed in less than one hour, depending on size of the area being treated.

How many peels will I need?

The superficial peels are usually done several times over the course of several months. The deeper peels usually only need to be performed once to achieve the desired effect. Regardless of the technique, you will likely need repeat treatments in the future.

How long do the results last?

With good sun protection, results can last months to years, depending on the depth of the peel. Generally, the deeper peels have a more long lasting effect.

What are the risks of chemical peels?

Superficial peels are quite safe although rarely minor irritation of the skin can occur. The risks of deeper peels include infection, scarring, redness, and discoloration. Furthermore, during a deep peel, anesthesia must be used and vital signs must be monitored throughout the procedure.

How long after a chemical peel before I can return to normal activities?

Superficial peels require no recovery time (hence the name “lunchtime peel”). Recovery from a deep peel requires occlusive bandages and can take weeks to months under normal circumstances.

What are chemical peels?

Chemical peels produce controlled injury to the skin which promotes growth of new skin with improved appearance. Many different chemicals are used for chemical peels and include glycolic acid, trichloroacetic acid (TCA), salicylic acid and phenol. The different chemical solutions produce different degrees of injury of the skin. There are two layers of the skin; the outer layer is called the epidermis and the inner layer, the dermis. Superficial peels (such as glycolic acid peels) produce very superficial injury, confined to the epidermis and can help improve conditions such as acne and discoloration. Deeper peels produce injury within the dermis and can reverse moderate-to-severe photoaging and wrinkles. In general, the deeper peels offer the most dramatic results but require longer recovery and carry a higher risk of complications.

Why are chemical peels used?

Chemical peels are used for the treatment of photoaging (from sun damage), wrinkles, scarring, acne, precancerous lesions, and discoloration (including melasma, freckles, and age spots).

How are chemical peels performed?

There are many different kinds of peels and each one is performed differently. In general, chemical peels usually begin with vigorous cleansing of the skin. Very light peels (e.g. low potency glycolic acid, 10-20% TCA) only penetrate the dead skin cells that sit atop the epidermis and produce almost no injury. Sometimes, this level of peel is called “exfoliation”. Light peels (70% glycolic acid, 25-35% TCA) injure the entire epidermis and stimulate the regeneration of a new epidermis. This level of chemical peel may produce a burning sensation during the procedure. Medium depth peels involve injury to the upper level of the dermis. Injury to the dermis stimulates the formation of collagen and “plumps” up the skin. 35% TCA, in combination with another chemical such as glycolic acid, is used safely with minimal discomfort. Burning is the most common complaint during the procedure and this is usually well controlled with cool compresses, and sometimes topical anesthetic. Deep peels involve injury to the mid dermis and are usually performed using a phenol solution and anesthesia.

How long do chemical peels take?

Most peels are performed in less than one hour, depending on size of the area being treated.

How many peels will I need?

The superficial peels are usually done several times over the course of several months. The deeper peels usually only need to be performed once to achieve the desired effect. Regardless of the technique, you will likely need repeat treatments in the future.

How long do the results last?

With good sun protection, results can last months to years, depending on the depth of the peel. Generally, the deeper peels have a more long lasting effect.

What are the risks of chemical peels?

Superficial peels are quite safe although rarely minor irritation of the skin can occur. The risks of deeper peels include infection, scarring, redness, and discoloration. Furthermore, during a deep peel, anesthesia must be used and vital signs must be monitored throughout the procedure.

How long after a chemical peel before I can return to normal activities?

Superficial peels require no recovery time (hence the name “lunchtime peel”). Recovery from a deep peel requires occlusive bandages and can take weeks to months under normal circumstances.

Permanent Cosmetic Procedures

 How are permanent cosmetic procedures performed?

Permanent cosmetics procedures are performed using various methods, including the traditional tattoo or coil machines, the pen or rotary machine and the non-machine or hand method. The process includes an initial consultation, then application of pigment, and at least one or more follow up visits for adjusting the shape and color or density of the pigment.

Who benefits from having permanent cosmetics?

People who are young, and the elderly, who desire a soft, natural enhancement to their appearance. It is especially beneficial to people who can’t wear other cosmetics due to allergies and skin sensitivities. Active people who want to look their best for activities such as swimming, hiking, biking, tennis, aerobics, and those who don’t want to worry about “sweating off” or reapplying cosmetics are good candidates. Also, the vision impaired who have difficulty applying their cosmetics, and others with motor impairments such as arthritis, Parkinson’s disease, multiple sclerosis, stroke survivors, and those with unsteady hands who cannot apply their own makeup benefit from this procedure.

What type of permanent cosmetic procedures can be done?

Permanent cosmetic procedures can be very subtle or dramatic depending on what you are looking for. Options include:

  • Eyebrows
  • Eyeliner, top and bottom
  • Areola repigmentation
  • Beauty marks
  • Lipliner and blend

Are permanent cosmetics really permanent?

Technically, permanent cosmetics procedures are considered permanent because the color is implanted into the upper reticular part of the dermal layer of the skin and cannot be washed off. However, as with any tattoo, fading can and often does occur, requiring periodic maintenance, color re-enhancement or color re-freshing. Just like hair color, furniture that may be located near a window, or even house paint, pigment implanted in the skin may fade with time.